Lauren Kilroy 

BA [Hons] Visual Communication Design

Hello, my name is Lauren! I’m an up-and-coming graphic designer based in Dublin. I have a professional interest in image-making, design for screen, photography, typography, branding and UX design. My work stems from in-depth research along with developing a greater understanding of the audience I’m designing for. This makes my work more impactful and engaging. I also have an interest in socially conscious design. In 2020 I won the RSA Student Design Staff Choice Award under the Moving Pictures brief with my project Redress Fashion. I am currently a fellow of the RSA in London which is an organization that works on tackling global issues through design thinking.

Project Description: Uplift

Strength training isn’t just for bodybuilders—it’s essential for us all. Yet, a large proportion of society associate it with; danger, masculinity, and unapproachability. There are many mental and physical health benefits of strength training for women which are uncommonly known. After menopause women’s estrogen decreases which leads to the bodies bone density and muscle mass to become weaker. Strength training can tackle this as it increases bone density, muscle strength and promotes hormone balance. Lifting weights also improves blood circulation, confidence, boosts metabolism and can help to tackle general anxiety disorder.

Uplift is a campaign created for the HSE which breaks the stigma around strength training for women, encouraging more women over 50 to get involved by highlighting the health benefits and rebranding it as fun, approachable, and accessible.


Thesis Title: "The Greatest Athlete Ever"

—How Serena Williams is Used in Nike's Activism Style of Advertising.

Nike raise awareness of pressing issues in our society and promote inclusivity and diversity by creating ads that aim to change societies harmful stereotypes and motivate marginalised groups to become more involved in sports. A large part of the brand is celebrity endorsement. They turn athletes into heroes by celebrating their achievements and use them to raise awareness of pressing social issues. Serena Williams is one such athlete. As a Black woman, she features in many of Nike’s advertisements to address the issues of sexism and racism.