Edward Bickers 

BSc [Hons] Applied Psychology

Since starting my undergraduate degree in Applied Psychology, I have developed a passion for the subject. Positively impacting people's lives through their mental health is something I strive to be a part of. I regularly attend PSI events as well as volunteering with Ireland's national eating disorder helpline 'Bodywhys'. I hope that experiences I gain will help in my journey towards working in a clinical setting within psychology.

Thesis Title

Grit and self-efficacy between first and final year undergraduate students.


Project Description

This study aimed to investigate whether there is a relationship between a student’s year of study (first or final year) and their grit or self-efficacy, and whether a correlation exists between grit and self-efficacy.

The research surveyed 99 participants (32 male, 66 female, 1 preferred not to indicate gender) attending 7 different Irish universities between the ages of 18 and 58. There were 48 first years and 51 final years in the study. The design was between groups, cross sectional, quantitative and correlational. Two scales were used to measure each of the independent variables, the Short-Grit Scale (Duckworth & Quinn), and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (Jerusalem & Schwarzer).


Project Outcomes

Findings included a statistical significance in higher levels of final year students’ mean self-efficacy when compared to students in first year. Final year students also had higher average grit scores than first year students, however this was not a statistically significant difference. There was a statistically meaningful correlation between grit and self-efficacy, indicating a relationship between the two variables. This suggests that the higher a student’s self-efficacy, the more likely they will have grit instilled in them.

The results of this study contribute to the area of educational psychology. There has been little research on grit and self- efficacy between year of study in college, and among an Irish sample. The study facilitates generalisability towards the Irish student population. Future research could look at self-efficacy and grit in conjunction to aspects of mental health such as well-being or stress.


Results

The results of this study contribute to the area of educational psychology. There has been little research on grit and self- efficacy between year of study in college, and among an Irish sample. The study facilitates generalisability towards the Irish student population. Future research could look at self-efficacy and grit in conjunction to aspects of mental health such as well-being or stress.